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Quick vid on not holding or holding back your breath
February 16, 2015
3:42 am
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daniel formica
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Also a little Sam Smith I just learned it I figured I would throw it in.

list=PLoWcfXjHDXqhdL_N_0yO5o-6HqCFX32on&index=13

February 16, 2015
12:08 pm
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Adam Mishan
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I really liked the Sam Smith cover, it shows off the control you have over your voice, I just wish you would have crescendo-ed a little bit more on the words "say" and "when" in the chorus. But other than that, it was really good.

That is an interesting perspective. I look at it like this, you need to build up air pressure, depending on the sound you are looking to achieve, (light or heavy), you will need more or less of that air pressure but it needs to be there in order to be connected. When I do build up that air pressure beneath the cords my lower body does engage reflexively to keep that air pressure going (just like if you cough your muscles will naturally kick), but it should never be a forced tightening of the abdominal muscles, that will lead to strain.

Am I holding the air back while I sing? Yeah, I guess I am because otherwise air pressure wouldn't build up, but you can't take that too far because then you will choke yourself. It is a balance. The most important thing I have learnt about singing is that it is all about balance, chord closure with air flow and chest resonance with head resonance.

As in all of life, without a good balance something will go awry.

February 16, 2015
1:14 pm
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OwenKorzec
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Over my first few years singing I have gone back and forth between trying to blow out a lot of air vs. hold back the air more. I've experienced problems with both but lately I've been getting around a good balance I hope.

I feel it's important to note there is also a problem with blowing too much air, Dan I don't know if you get students who do this, but I used to do it - it's like when singers think they have to blow harder to sing higher or louder and that that's the big secret to singing. I know because I have been there. It is almost a little "shortcut" trick but it gets the voice stuck in an extremely loud sound and really beats it up.

February 16, 2015
3:20 pm
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Adam Mishan
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OwenKorzec said
I feel it's important to note there is also a problem with blowing too much air, Dan I don't know if you get students who do this, but I used to do it - it's like when singers think they have to blow harder to sing higher or louder and that that's the big secret to singing. I know because I have been there. It is almost a little "shortcut" trick but it gets the voice stuck in an extremely loud sound and really beats it up.

I also went through that exact same phase. I was straining on high notes and so I concluded that the opposite of the strain was air flow so I would blow more air but my voice had no longevity or power as a result.

February 16, 2015
3:34 pm
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daniel formica
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@Adam Im sure if I was recording and making it perfect I would hold on to the crescendo and decrescendos longer but I just learned it and I wasn't about to make it perfect.

As far as the the "air pressure" you are building up what is the gage you are using to measure it. This is the thing as you get more skillful the better your cords get at adducting and "holding back the air". That is what gives you this feeling of pressure if there was no valve (cords)the air would pour out. So as time goes on and your technique gets better you will feel this air to sing on better. It is about balance the balance of the cords doing their job efficiently at holding back the air not physically holding back the air.

@owen the air rushed out because you didn't have the vocal cord strength and coordination to stop the air. Once you the cords get more skillful at staying closed it will be natural. That is the process you don't want to rush. If you do you will sound like you are holding back the air and holding your breath.

I'm gonna make more vids this year guys. I'm gonna be the old wise man(46) doing my best to bring the technique that I learned years ago and used to make a living. I hope I can help whoever will listen.

February 16, 2015
3:52 pm
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daniel formica
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Another way that you will see that trying to hold your breath or physically hold back the air gets weird is on live gigs. I've been in show bands for 20 years these gigs whether it was disco,80's or hair metal I had dance steps and had to have a lot of energy running around doing David lee Roth kick etc, I was nicknamed Micro Jackson cause of my stature and energy. if I was to concentrate on holding I would have never been a able to run around and sing however by getting the vocal cords more efficient at their job and letting those little muscles do their job at balancing the air I could stand on my head do cartwheels and sing .

February 16, 2015
6:22 pm
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Adam Mishan
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Right. That's why I say, that the engagement of support needs to become reflexive. I'm not even fully there. My voice is hit and miss live because I have some major anxiety about performing and these final pieces of technique are still not completely reflexive.

You on the other hand, must have it in the bag because you have been singing ballsy songs on stage for years.

February 16, 2015
6:52 pm
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daniel formica
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the thing is ballsy and singing out loud is much easier than being sensitive and going for tone and beauty. for me its always easier to sing with a nice loud band vs an acoustic and thats it

February 16, 2015
7:44 pm
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Adam Mishan
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Yes I hear that. But what I meant more by ballsy is the notes you are hitting on a regular basis and the intensity with which they are sung which is hard to keep up for a 90 min set.

February 16, 2015
7:55 pm
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daniel formica
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well if you look at it like higher is harder and needs more you will get tired. thats the thing and you should bring this up on wednesday. Singing is counter intuitive less is more ..

February 16, 2015
8:00 pm
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Adam Mishan
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Yes, good idea, I will.

btw I like the haircut

and can someone tell me how to make a clickable link in my signature.

February 17, 2015
1:33 am
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Phil Moufarrege
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Nice vid Dan, make more like these dude! A little song at the start and a vocal tip is a great formula I think.

The way I tend to help people get better at compression is by having them either exhale air and sing scales or just do very very long scales or holding sustained notes until they run out of air. Over time they get used to not using too much breathiness (unless they want that specifically for a sexy tone. The key is having it as a choice not a limitation.)

I also think the SLS exercises tend to deal with this well because of the consonants in the scales as long as the singer understands how to translate that on open vowels later.

If you have a really breathy singer who just blasts air when they go higher (even on consonants scales like BUP BUP BUP or GO GO GO) what do you tend to have them do?

@PhilMoufarrege
Online Vocal Coach, Singer/Songwriter
Grow-The-Voice.com | PHILMOUFARREGE.com

February 17, 2015
2:24 am
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daniel formica
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ill have them close their mouth and do staccato humming. And if the are doing guh or gee or goo or goo, it needs to be quick and not held out, the purpose of the exercise is the g not the length of vowel. in time it will get sharper. Also low scales only traveling to Bb3 on ee or ah as in cat.

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