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Nose clip
September 10, 2014
5:30 pm
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DeffStarr
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So I did some testing the other day.

I realised that I'm rather nasally when I talk. There's a natural buzz in my nose and if I pinch my nose then my voice changes.

I kind of understand there should be some form of nasal resonance when we sing, I just wondered if this nasality in my speaking carries over to my singing.
I put a nose clip on my nose, used to stop water going into your nose when swimming, and found my voice changes quite a lot.
Should I try to change this? It doesn't pick up on recordings.

September 11, 2014
12:33 am
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OwenKorzec
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When singing,

If it doesn't sound funny on recordings with the mic either
A. placed higher up closer to the nose
B. placed far away

And C. doesn't leave you with a sensation of a resonance ceiling on your high notes (like your jaw and tongue is fully dropped on an ah but your throat still can't create enough vertical space to get you higher)

Then you are fine.

But if any of those problems above are happening, then you should try to reduce it which is honestly very hard to explain how to do. The action is very simple - closing up the velopharyngeal ? port, very similar to raising the soft palate. But that's not an action we can just control at will just by thinking of that exactly in isolation (nothing in life teaches us exactly how), you often need to think of a weird reference or combination of a few (I think that's what I do) to achieve it indirectly.

Felipe once listed for me a whole bunch of references/sensations for raising the soft palate to eliminate nasality, maybe he could chime in here.

Taking a more top-down approach to your warm up (focusing a lot on the A4+ area) can also help because high notes tend to require a more lifted soft palate and if you get that warmed up just using vowels only, it will tend to stay throughout your range easier and prevent nasalization on the vowels.

As for speaking, I might have nasality in my speech too, not sure. But I do believe it decreases when I'm warmed up. As I said I've developed a degree of control over it as well, only because I used to be nasal and learned how to get rid of it.

Lastly about nasal resonance. Never really understood that term but I think it's just a poor replacement for head resonance. When in actuality head resonance doesn't reside in the nose in any way. I think someone just got confused along the way and started calling it the wrong thing. That's my theory at least.

September 11, 2014
1:45 am
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Phil Moufarrege
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Firstly MM and NN sounds will always be nasal.
Secondly, from hearing you Jordan, you are not nasal when you are singing with correct support. You may encounter some problems if you forget to engage your entire support mechanism.

@PhilMoufarrege
Online Vocal Coach, Singer/Songwriter
Grow-The-Voice.com | PHILMOUFARREGE.com

September 11, 2014
1:59 am
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OwenKorzec
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Phil Moufarrege said
Firstly MM and NN sounds will always be nasal.

also NG.

September 12, 2014
9:14 am
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Felipe Carvalho
Brazil
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May I ask what is the problem you are trying to fix if it does not sound nasal on the recording?

Is there any other issue that you think that may be related to it?

As it was pointed, when singing or speaking phrases we use our noses. You can't even say "nose" without doing so :P. So just pinching the nose and expecting to not have ANYTHING coming through it, is really no reference. When it's used is on single vowels, and the idea is usually working on tensions on the tongue and etc...

Felipe Carvalho
Singer and Voice Teacher in Brasil - São Paulo

September 12, 2014
9:21 am
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DeffStarr
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I just wondered.

I wanted to create a clear tone and perfect tone and thought the buzz in my nose was the hindrance to a lot of things.

Going over it more and more I can sense it's not a problem.

September 12, 2014
11:02 am
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Felipe Carvalho
Brazil
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I understand... I will try to come up with something that can be helpful, for now in my opinion if the nasalance itself is not a problem, it's much better to not try to adjust it, first because it probably is not nasal as Phil said, second because it's very easy to result in tongue tensions, which are much less fun to live with than a little bit of nasalance (if it's so).

Felipe Carvalho
Singer and Voice Teacher in Brasil - São Paulo

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