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Strength Training
September 3, 2014
7:52 am
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Phil Moufarrege
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This post is for Yam, but anyone interested in strength development and muscle growth may be interested in the following.

To obtain functional strength (which means the strength translates into real life movements) then the body must be worked as a unit, not separate body parts. Compound lifts stimulate the most muscle growth, strength growth and carry over into real life.

The two types of lifts you need to incorporate are pushing and pulling lifts. It is best to alternate between them so while the pushing muscles are resting the pulling muscles are being worked.

I am not a fan of the "split" workouts of "work my pinky finger today, work my left eyebrow tomorrow" kind of thinking. Work the body as a whole everytime.

here is a routine that was a staple for old-time strength and bodybuilders (who were huge and strong way before steroids and protein powders). All of these are to be done with free weights (barbells), no machines. Machines take out the most important aspect of strength training: stabilization muscles Machines will leave you prone to injury because you only strengthen large muscles without the stabilizers.

here's a killer routine. Once a week will be plenty:

1. 20 rep squat (no smith machine) if there is no power rack then replace this with 20 rep deadlifts.
2. barbell shoulder press 8-12 reps
3. weighted pullups 8-12 reps
4. barbell benchpress/weighted dips 8-12 reps
5. barbell shrugs 15 reps
6. stiff legged deadlifts 15 reps

second gym session:
1. deadlifts 10 sets of 1. Never lift more than 80% of your max, don't go to failure.
2. bench 5 sets of 5. Go as heavy as you can but make sure you pace yourself so you can hit 5 reps for 5 sets.
3. weighted pullups 5 sets 5. Go as heavy as you can but make sure you pace yourself so you can hit 5 reps for 5 sets.

the second routine will really build nervous system strength/myofibular hypotropy - muscles become denser/stronger not larger).

the third day you do your calisthenics.

It is very important that when you have 3 sessions like this that you balance the INTENSITY of them so that they are manageable it is silly to just go all out 3 days a week because you will most likely not be able to sustain it for longer than a few weeks. Remember, LONG TERM is more important. I recommend starting light/moderate with the resistance so that you don't get too sore. This way you can build your technique and the GROOVE and consistency. Always try to leave a rep or two in the bank, that will help you stay consistent.

Later there are things I want to talk to you about in regards to isometrics but for now this will do you good.

@PhilMoufarrege
Online Vocal Coach, Singer/Songwriter
Grow-The-Voice.com | PHILMOUFARREGE.com

September 3, 2014
7:54 am
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Phil Moufarrege
Japan
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Here is a trusted source on good form for the major lifts:
Deadlift:
http://stronglifts.com/how-to-.....technique/

Squat:
http://stronglifts.com/squat/

Shoulder press:
http://stronglifts.com/how-to-.....technique/

Bench:
http://stronglifts.com/how-to-.....-injuries/

VERY IMPORTANT: When lifting heavy always pull-up the pelvic floor otherwise you can get a hernia. The pelvic floor will help get your transversus abdominis (the corset muscle - your natural weightlifting belt) into play when you inhale and tense the abs. Use the same support technique you do for singing. deadlifting will improve your ability to support in singing too if you focus on keeping the throat relaxed.

@PhilMoufarrege
Online Vocal Coach, Singer/Songwriter
Grow-The-Voice.com | PHILMOUFARREGE.com

September 3, 2014
9:31 am
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yamhaimovich
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Very cool Phil. Thank you for this.

What do you recommend for rest time in between sets? Also should I do this two days in a row, or split up the first and second routine during the week?

September 3, 2014
9:36 am
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Phil Moufarrege
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The first workout is only 1 set for each exercise. Rest as much as you need betwen exercises.
2nd workout rest 3 minutes max.

No way should you do this two days in a row. Spread a few days between them. You could do this:

Monday: work out 1
tues: rest
Wed: calisthenics
thurs: rest
fri: workout 2
sat: rest
sun: rest

I stress not to do these workouts SO intense that you cannot maintain consistency. They should be hard but if you make them BRUTAL then you wnt be able to sustain these for very long. in order to find the right balance, start light/medium and add weight each week until you find the balance. It should give you a hard workout but shouldnt make you afraid of each workout. if you find yourself getting scared before you enter the gym then its too brutal. I used to train the first workout only once a week but did the intensity so hard that i literally was scared to enter the gym. that type of intensity wont be able to be maintained more than once or twice a week. so a 3 day program shouldnt be at that level of intensity.

@PhilMoufarrege
Online Vocal Coach, Singer/Songwriter
Grow-The-Voice.com | PHILMOUFARREGE.com

September 3, 2014
9:48 am
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yamhaimovich
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Ya I will try and pace myself. It's easy to go overboard with this stuff.

September 3, 2014
10:00 am
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Phil Moufarrege
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yamhaimovich said

Ya I will try and pace myself. It's easy to go overboard with this stuff.

tell me about it LOL

@PhilMoufarrege
Online Vocal Coach, Singer/Songwriter
Grow-The-Voice.com | PHILMOUFARREGE.com

September 9, 2014
6:18 am
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TommyTheHat
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It's been a long time since I've seen reference to 20 rep squats and 5 sets of 5 . Wow! Those were a big part of my training some years back. The 5x5 lifting routine I did was based on something by old time lifter Brooks Kubik. I'm sure he's written more since the time but the big book of his back then was "Dinosaur Training." 5 sets of 5...heavy weight. Starting with a weight you can't get all 5 sets of 5 and building from there. As for the 20 rep squats well that was real old style, 20 rep HEAVY weight squats. I'm not sure if these are what Phil is referring to. Randall J. Strossen wrote a great book called "Super Squats." This routine was based on a method dating back to days before the bench Press was even thought of yet. This type of squat builds the whole body. It forces it to grow (utilizing the right amount and right kinds of food of course).. But it was tough. I did these for a few years,

The idea was to take a weight that would cause you to fail at rep 11. In other words a ten rep max weight. Then do one set (only) 20 reps, no matter how long it takes. So at rep 10 you would struggle to get the weight up. Then stand there and breath until you could muster up enough to barely push out another rep. Continue until you hit 20. They were also called breathing squats an believe me by rep 13 you were breathing like a freight train. A set would sometimes take 20 minutes or more. Also, a key factor here was to make sure you were squatting low. At least to where the top of your thighs were parallel to the ground but preferably ass to calves. Form was of paramount importance and especially back form and knees/foot placement. Talk about all around strength and growth! These squats could only be done once every week or two.

From Brooks Kubik I also began my journey into odd lifts. Sandbags, heavy stones, metal objects, tires, tree stumps etc.

Tommy

"It's not how many notes you know. It's what you do with them."

September 9, 2014
8:14 pm
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Phil Moufarrege
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TommyTheHat said

It's been a long time since I've seen reference to 20 rep squats and 5 sets of 5 . Wow! Those were a big part of my training some years back. The 5x5 lifting routine I did was based on something by old time lifter Brooks Kubik. I'm sure he's written more since the time but the big book of his back then was "Dinosaur Training." 5 sets of 5...heavy weight. Starting with a weight you can't get all 5 sets of 5 and building from there. As for the 20 rep squats well that was real old style, 20 rep HEAVY weight squats. I'm not sure if these are what Phil is referring to. Randall J. Strossen wrote a great book called "Super Squats." This routine was based on a method dating back to days before the bench Press was even thought of yet. This type of squat builds the whole body. It forces it to grow (utilizing the right amount and right kinds of food of course).. But it was tough. I did these for a few years,

The idea was to take a weight that would cause you to fail at rep 11. In other words a ten rep max weight. Then do one set (only) 20 reps, no matter how long it takes. So at rep 10 you would struggle to get the weight up. Then stand there and breath until you could muster up enough to barely push out another rep. Continue until you hit 20. They were also called breathing squats an believe me by rep 13 you were breathing like a freight train. A set would sometimes take 20 minutes or more. Also, a key factor here was to make sure you were squatting low. At least to where the top of your thighs were parallel to the ground but preferably ass to calves. Form was of paramount importance and especially back form and knees/foot placement. Talk about all around strength and growth! These squats could only be done once every week or two.

From Brooks Kubik I also began my journey into odd lifts. Sandbags, heavy stones, metal objects, tires, tree stumps etc.

Tommy

Wow you know about Dinosaur Training too? Brooks is one of the last true renaissance strongmen around. Another is Steve Justa and Bud Jefferies. The old timers knew the real subtleties of how to build tremendous strength in a time way before drugs, steroids or supplements.

Steve Justa is one to look at. That guy trains just like the guys did 100 years ago with isometrics, barrell lifts etc, Arthur Saxon style. Strengthh that can lift a truck without supplements or drugs. No puffy fake muscles. True functional strength and size.

Its so cool when you meet people who share multiple interests, not just singing but not old time strongmen stuff.

@PhilMoufarrege
Online Vocal Coach, Singer/Songwriter
Grow-The-Voice.com | PHILMOUFARREGE.com

September 9, 2014
8:33 pm
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TommyTheHat
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Yea, I did my share of thick handled weight lifting Laugh

I think I have a collectors magazine somewhere with John Grimek on the cover. And my Copy of Dinosaur Training is signed. First addition.

"It's not how many notes you know. It's what you do with them."

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